What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart
What I Ride - Chase Dehart

What I Ride – Chase DeHart

Chase DeHart’s bike is synonymous with his classic smooth and nimble riding style. Minus a slight rise in his bars, his tried and true set up has remained unchanged for the last 10 years and is low and trim, and boasts two pegs and cassette. Chase’s simple and refined ride consists of numerous signature parts, including his V3 Cult Butter frame, slim DeHart seat, tires, Butter pegs, and a new Animal sprocket.
Height: 6’
Weight: 155 lbs.
Location: Mount Royal, NJ
Sponsors: Cult, Animal, Etnies, Dans Comp, Peep Game, reshoevn8er

What I Ride - Chase Dehart
Frame: Cult signature DeHart Butter V3
Fork: Cult “IC” V2
Bars: Cult Leader 8.75”
Stem: Animal MR front load
Grips: Duo Corey Martinez (pictured), but usually my signature Cult DeHart grips
Barends: Cult
Headset: Cult
Clamp: Integrated
Seatpost: Cult Tripod
Seat: Cult signature DeHart Tripod
Pedals: Cult Dak pedals, painted gold for Mirra R.I.P
Cranks: Cult Hawk, 175mm
Sprocket: Animal signature Thorofare sprocket 25-T
Chain: Cult half-link
Front Tire: Cult DeHart 2.35”
Front Wheel: Cinema stock wheel
Rear Tire: Cult DeHart 2.20”
Rear Wheel: Primo Mix wheel, Primo nylon hub guard
Pegs: Cult signature Butter pegs (I think I have an Animal Butcher peg on the rear in these pictures though).

Tell us about some of the updates to your Butter V3 frame. I understand you guys made it a little more affordable.
Yea we got the retail price down to $249.99 by cutting down on some of the branding, like logos on the gussets and chain stay bridge… basically just small details that add a little money to make. Which I’m happy about because all the other Cult frames have all of that stuff if it’s important to you, but if you’re looking to save a little money, but still want a quality frame, then $250 for a Cult frame is a good deal and I’m glad we have that option. Other changes to the frame is shorter back end, little bit lighter than my old frames, dropped the bottom bracket like a 1/4 inch, seat tube is slightly taller, and the top tube sizes are back to traditional sizes, we were doing like the 20.6 and the in-between off sizes to the normal sizes, but I think it just was confusing and not needed to have those options anymore.

“$250 for a Cult frame is a good deal and I’m glad we have that option.”

Why do you prefer to run thinner tires (by todays standards)?
I never thought of my tires as thin, but I guess I didn’t realize how big tires got, even though my signature tires come huge now [laughs]. I just like my bike to feel quick and responsive for spins and manuals, big tires are sluggish and just doesn’t feel that good to me, but I might give them a shot.

You mentioned to me how kids have commented that your bars are too small. Have you considered going bigger? Why, why not?
Yea [laughs], kids think my bars are low compared to today’s standards, I personally just think big bars are gross and it changes your style of riding completely, I like to be hunched over, I don’t like the strict back look and the high front end look, everyone’s style right now is pretty terrible, no offense, I think their bike set-up has a lot to do with it, but that’s just my opinion and preference. You don’t see like dipped 3’s or good looking manuals, everyone just looks lazy and standing so straight up, like a scooter. It’s terrible.

Overall, your bike seems to have a more low-profile and narrow feel to it—front load stem with no spacers, narrow bars not too tall, and a slim seat. Is that a conscious decision or just how it ended up?
Yeah that’s just my bike, I’ve been riding that same set-up for 10 years now, my back end got a little shorter and my bars got like a 1/4 inch taller, that’s about it [laughs]. That’s just what I think looks good, I’m coming from a time where bikes had style, I guess I’m fashion over function I don’t know, but I like how my bike looks and feels, so I’m cool with it.

Tell us about your signature Animal sprocket.
It’s called “Thorofare”, which is the name of the town I grew up in all my life—the shittiest small town that I don’t even think you can find on the map. But I figure the sewer cap represents that town so I named it that, place is a shit hole but I love it there. And it being solid is basically just to handle abuse, I think parts are coming full circle like back in the day with the bash guards and shit. I think durability is up right now because everyone’s grinding everything and doing sprocket stalls again and crank arm grinds, figured we’d just keep it basic and solid, and I like how it looks a lot.

            “Four pegs and a coaster just feels slow and clunky”

You’ve pretty much been two pegs and a cassette since day one. Have you messed around with three-four pegs and/or a coaster?
Yeah, people kind of expect me to put the four pegs on and stuff, I try saying that if anything I would take my pegs off. I don’t know if people really focus on my riding, but my style of riding isn’t riding ledges and flat rails and doing a bunch of grind tricks. I like to go fast and do lines and hit wallrides and rail hops and shit. Four pegs and a coaster just feels slow and clunky and too much going on, I like to flow and be fluid as possible—if the setup or spot lets me, I don’t care about tricks, I never have. I admit some times it looks fun to have four pegs, maybe if I can get my foot to stop touching the back peg I’d try again.

What are some preferences for your bike set up overall? What makes it your ride?
I like low tire pressure like at 60psi just because it seems like my hop is a little better when it’s low, my bars lined up with my forks, maybe a little bit forward, my chain super tight so my cranks are always where I left them on whips, seat slim and pretty much slammed because seats are gross looking, all black because colors are just not for me—I’m not a colorful guy, simple white sticker placements.

“I personally just think big bars are gross and it changes your style of riding completely.”

What are you most particular about on your bike?
How it looks and feels, at this point I know any small change because my bikes have been the same for so long. If anything is different I know and I can convince myself I need to go back to what I know too easily. I don’t like change I guess, but I’m cool with it I still like my bike and how it feels I’m not bored—yet.

Part or setup wise, what was the last big change you made? A game changer even…
[Laughs] literally the biggest change I made was going from an 8.5” rise bar to an 8.75” and that was really hard to do [laughs]. I’d be like fuck, I like how 180s and roll outs feel with the 8.5” but I like my hop better with the 8.75.” I’d go back and forth fighting it, then finally just let it go and kept the 8.75” on. I’m a head case, I notice too much, those slight changes change how you do certain things and I don’t want to do any tricks different or feel different. But the taller bars definitely makes hopping feel easier—at least I think so, anyway… because I hopped fine with out them too, so who knows.

Watch Chase get busy in the streets of LA in his RideBMX X Cult video right here…