While there are certain frame designs on the BMX market today that are shorter and tighter than ever, the availability of traditional style frames is still very much there and is very necessary for a trail rider these days. Jumps are bigger and faster than ever and the demands of a frame are high. You’re not going to see too many (if any at all) riders jumping big sets on a bike with a 13″ rear end and no brake mounts–jumps these days require a more relaxed headtube angle, a roomy top tube, and a backend in the high end of the 13 inch range–perhaps even into the 14 inch realm. Fortunately, there are plenty of options out there in the BMX world these days and we’re going to take a look at some of them.

Fit Inman Frame
Justin Inman’s signature frame from Fit is built for big riders riding big jumps. With top tube options of either 21″ or 21.5″ inches and a 14.25″-14.75″ backend, this thing is built for the woods, floating through the tree tops. The head tube angle is pretty average (74.5 degrees) and the back end has clearance for tires as wide as 2.3″. Plus, it’s made in the S&M warehouse in Santa Ana–what more could you ask for?